Common sense will tell you that any occupation could be dangerous in its own unique way. However, as nearly everyone recognizes, some jobs are inherently more dangerous than others. A recent report concerning on-the-job deaths in Massachusetts shines a harsh spotlight on several of the most dangerous occupations in the state.

One of the most disturbing points the report revealed was that work-related deaths have not declined. Instead, the data period from January 2017 through March 1, 2018 saw an 11-year high (74 deaths) in Massachusetts. Below you will find additional workplace injury statistics uncovered by the report.

  • Almost 80,000 non-fatal occupational illnesses and injuries were recorded during the data period.
  • Transportation-related events resulted in 31 fatalities, with many of the victims not wearing seat belts.
  • Construction accidents remain the most significant problem, accounting for 33 percent of work-related fatalities.
  • Out of every 100,000 workers in the state, 2.1 suffered fatal workplace injuries.

The president of the Massachusetts American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) said this about the report’s findings: “We lack leadership at the federal level for improving working conditions.” He also indicated that under the current federal administration, workplace safety appears to be “going backwards.”

Everyone appreciates having workers’ compensation to rely on when an injury occurs in the workplace. However, improving unsafe working conditions across the nation makes sense on many levels. For example, better safety measures mean less hazardous environments for employees and reduced costs for employers.

Consider seeking a legal opinion if you are concerned about your workplace safety or if you have trouble filing a workers’ compensation claim. Accurate claim information helps federal and state lawmakers address safety in the workplace more effectively.

Source: Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, “Dangerous Jobs Killed 74 Workers in Massachusetts,” accessed May 08, 2018