Nurses and other health care workers face some unique challenges with biological workplace hazards. But many employed in other professions are surprised to find themselves at risk of biological hazards in fields that have nothing to do with health care.

Biological hazards arise from natural components in animals, humans or plants. They can originate in insect or vermin infestations, fungus or mold spores or sick people or animals. The management of these biohazards can determine how they affect the workers exposed to them.

Suppose, for instance, your workplace is located in an older building where asbestos is being removed. The business owner and asbestos removal company must take steps to ensure that no workers are exposed to the deadly carcinogen on the job. Ditto for black mold spores that can grow after a leak or flooding occurs.

Hazard management is key to keeping workers safer from biological hazards in the workplace. Your company should have protocols and policies in place to protect employees from exposure to dangerous elements or conditions that could compromise their health and well-being.

Should your employer drop the ball on this vital safety issue and you get ill or suffer an injury as a result of your workplace exposure to a biological hazard in the workplace, you may need to file a claim for workers’ compensation benefits.

Filing your claim is the first step in obtaining financial and other compensation to help make you whole after the damages and losses you suffered as a result of your exposure to a biological hazard in your place of employment.