Nobody likes to appear weak on the job in front of their boss. That’s why some workers who suffer injuries on the job may be unwilling to report the incidents to their supervisors.

They may fear being penalized for getting hurt (which is illegal) or otherwise suffer adverse events if they formally report a workplace injury. Alternatively, in some instances, they may think that admitting to an injury makes them appear to be less capable than their co-workers and less likely to be promoted.

But whatever the reason, failing to timely report your on-the-job injury is a really bad move. For one, you may have injured yourself far more than you initially realize.

Not all symptoms of serious injuries manifest immediately. In the case of a blow to the head, a person with life-threatening injuries may appear to shake it off. They can talk coherently and stand up and walk around in the minutes immediately following the head injury. But unbeknownst to them and others around them, a deadly brain bleed can be occurring. If they fail to seek medical treatment during that golden hour, they can easily succumb to their injuries.

But you don’t have to suffer a fatal blow to the head to experience problems down the line after an unreported workplace injury. A momentary stumble can cause microscopic tears in the muscles and ligaments of your knee. Without stabilizing treatment, the injuries can gradually worsen, rendering you eventually unable to carry out your job duties.

But without your initial report of the injury, you will have a very challenging time tying your injury to the incident at work. That can mean the difference between your receiving the medical care and financial compensation that you deserve from workers’ compensation benefits and having to foot the bill yourself.

If you get injured while carrying out your duties at work, report it immediately. Then, while you heal, allow us to file and process your worker’s compensation claim and reap the benefits which you deserve.